Balcones Canyonlands – first run finished!

I apologize for not posting much in the way of in-progress notes about this print. There are some things I’d like to talk about, and I might get to them eventually. But in the mean time, I’m done! Here are some shots of the prints drying.

This print run included 30 prints – 4 on Shin Torinoko as practice prints, 20 on Kitaro’s (https://www.washi-kitaro.com/) Kizuki, and 6 on the Shin Hosho I ordered from Matsumura-san. There’s some variation in thickness in each of these washi batches. One of the sheets from Kitaro was noticeably thicker than the others; this didn’t seem to affect the printing very much, though. The Shin Hosho sheet I used was thinner than any of the sheets I used for the Naoshima Coast print, and I really liked printing on it! It was easy to get a smooth, intense impression. You might remember I struggled with smooth impressions on the Naoshima print. I think if all the sheets had been like this one, printing would have been a piece of cake!

Here’s an example of the finished print, held so the embossing can be seen. This is one of the Shin Hosho sheets, but the Kizuki prints also turned out quite nicely; the paper color is a little creamier on those.

I’m pretty happy with how these turned out.

Goodies from Japan!

Shipping is (was?) kind of slow because of the reduction in flights, but a few days ago I got a package of goodies from Mokuhankan! Three small prints, and a “cat bus” print party print, possibly printed by Dave (I saw him print some on his Twitch stream!)

(I feel lucky that my shipment was able to get here. It took a long time – like 3 weeks or so. Now Japan Post is not accepting any shipments to the USA, because there are no flights to put them on. This is a real hardship for businesses in Japan whose customers are mostly in other places.)

So what’s in the small packages? Here are the three prints with no wrapping or plastic in the way.

The detail and printing skill of these little prints is really impressive. Here are some closeups:

And check out the beautiful embossing on the heron! The official name for this technique is karazuri, or “empty printing.” I’m in awe of the fine lines and delicate detail of these prints.